The Pitfalls of Using Free Resume Cover Letters

You’ve seen them before – free resume cover letters that promise to make your job a lot easier and faster. They’re readily available, they offer you what you need and they don’t cost a dime, so what’s the harm?

The trouble with free resume cover letters

Well, for starters, free resume cover letters do not maintain the same quality as other resume cover letters. If you’re a job hunter who’s been in the job market for too long, you know the kind of pressure you face everyday. Not only are the number of potential employers shrinking, the number of potential rivals for a job position also increases. As more and more people discover the very same job you’re applying for, your chances of getting the job you want gets smaller and smaller.

That only makes using a resume cover letter extremely important. When you’re too stressed out and worried about the competition, there is a possibility that you’ll slip and produce a less than perfect resume cover letter, prime feed for the trash can or the paper shredding machine. That is not the kind of scenario you want. So why can’t you not use free resume cover letters?

They’re not all that bad, these free resume cover letters. Problem is, they’re also not that good. They will do, but only for jobs that you’re really not interested in or for those who have no other applicant other than you. Free cover letter samples are often not as excellently written and not as good as professionally prepared cover letter samples. In a job market where you’ll need all the help you could get, free resume cover letters are simply not good news at all.

Using free resume cover letters

Resume cover letters will say a great deal about you – they will inform your potential employer about your professional capabilities and give them a glimpse of what your personality is like.

Now let’s take a look at how you’ll use a free resume cover letter and see why it has ‘cheap’ written all over it. When you find a free resume cover letter, you’ll usually find one that is written with a general feel of what a resume cover letter should read like. You get the usual greetings, introductions, body of the letter and your closing statements.

Since this cover letter was published to help everyone from a nanny to a chief financial officer, you’ll have to change several elements in order to come up with a resume cover letter that seems tailored for your own particular qualifications. Now all you have to do is to mail it and hope for the best.

Problem is, once the hiring manager reads this so-called cover letter of yours, what will he see? A cover letter that looks so familiar he probably has read it before. In fact, he must have, considering that it must have been written using a free resume cover letter that has been available on the internet for the past five years.

Worse, it’s probably been seen and used by thousands of other job hunters before you, some of which may have sent their applications using the very same free resume cover letter that you yourself used! Imagine how badly that will reflect on you.

Avoid this type of pitfall that is so common among job hunters that it should have been outlawed by now. It’s hard enough to compete in a cutthroat job market. Actually ruining your chances with a badly written free resume cover letter is not just a mistake, it’s a crime.

Mario Churchill is a freelance author and has written over 200 articles on various subjects. For more information on free resume cover letter checkout his recommended websites.

Author: Mario J. Churchill


On Campus Interviews – A Chance for Your “First Job” as Well as Career Employment

During the course of training or secondary educations some organizations – companies, firms as well as major non-profit organizations of great status and reputation will offer campus interviews to graduating students in such fields as engineering, electronics, business management, law accounting, computer information systems and marketing. In addition such “on campus” interviews are also afforded at many major technical schools in similar and matching fields and endeavors.

The hardest point for many, in terms of their careers, and the progress of their careers is to get their “foot into the door”. Even if you do not necessarily like the job, the company or organization- the value of these jobs is that they will do just that – get you started in your field of choice. What is most important is the contacts and networking you will be able to do. The hardest part so to speak is “to get your first job”.

Once you are in that position of employment several factors will work into play: first of all you will make valuable contacts within your industry. In a sense you never know who that you meet, when working and interacting within your job and career that can help you. One contact, in your network and daily interactions can lead to other useful contacts. It’s an organic process. Secondly, even if the firm or organization is not your first choice, for employment or career, you are in a position to prove yourself within that community. After all most jobs are not filled by applications and job postings. Most jobs are filled from within – by personal referrals and reputations and of course by the industry “grapevine”. By being employed, rather than not employed or “still looking”, you will be considered more valuable by other prospective employers. After all you are valuable enough that employer number one is paying you x salary. If employer number 2 wishes to hire you away – you not only have proven yourself, but in addition the second employer will have to pay you more, either in actual cash , benefits , a better job , or some other form of reward, in order to steal you away and hire you. Lastly by working in a job, rather than not being employed, most employers will fund various specialized courses and training, that you may not well not be able to afford, or may not be available to yourself.

Most on-campus interviews are prearranged interviews, and the techniques used varied, depending on the organization. They are usually structured interviews, but several styles may be used, including the “stress interview”, the “tell me about yourself interview”, and the panel interview styles.

Campus interviews are generally scheduled through a school or institution’s career services office or department. The schedule is closely observed, and the interviewer is forced to evaluate each candidate more quickly than standard interview procedures. It is said that in such scenarios the average interview time is between 20 and 30 minutes.

If you are lucky enough to be chosen and interviewed in such a setting and format what should you consider and stress during these meetings? First of all you should keep your remarks as concise and to the point as possible. You will find that most of the interviewers are professionally trained. They have been trained for this purpose and will know how to guide applicants through the fact finding process. It is best to let the interviewer take the lead. Go with the flow and format of the interview and its dynamic processes. Your job is to respond as concisely as possible without omitting pertinent information about your qualifications.

After all it may well lead to your first job in your chosen career and field of endeavors.

Shaun Stevens

http://www.winnipegjobshark.com
http://www.jerkbossesihaveknown.com
http://www.albertajobshark.com

Author: Shaun Stevens


Where Career Advice Might Live in Our Life

Most of us have tripped into our careers. Even those who went into professions like law and accountancy tell of taking up the training as nothing else had happened for them.

Why is it that most of us have not experienced career advice? In schools it is usual that the careers teacher is doing that job as one part of a wider portfolio. And that role is often administrative as the expectation is that there is a library of information that students can access. In universities it is not much better. One of the UK’s top universities requires students to pre-book a session where the student then has 15 minutes help with their cv. It is probably useful advice. How useful is it in the context of career advising as we might want it?

In business schools the students invest significantly for their programmes. The full-time MBA is paid for by the student who has also the opportunity cost of not working. The benefit and risk issues is significant to them. The part-time MBAs at business schools are over 2 years and are usually sponsored by the employer of the student. There is less risk to the student; they continue to be paid and their job continues after their MBA has been completed.

In these business schools, careers advice and support is critical to the full-time student. The student needs to understand fully the level of support that they will get throughout their course as the course budget gets squeezed by the costs of all the other components of the programmes. On the part-time MBA, the employers are skeptical (scared?) of any career advice lest the students walk away after the MBA is completed.

The stages above are just 3 examples of where career advice is useful. Some people are fortunate that they have access to good advice. They may have a parent or parents who take an interest and who are able to encourage their offspring down an appropriate channel. Sometimes there is a teacher or a mentor who has specific experience that is helpful. For most, though, the career issue is not prevalent until it lurches into view at key moments – when one leaves school or university or when when has finished that Masters.

These examples are obvious as they are at “rite of passage” points in our lives or where we may have taken a key decision to invest in our career. What would happen if careers were more central to our learning experiences at these key stages?

The best careers advice is achieved by understanding the capabilities of an individual. In a school context this is often well understood by the teaching community as they are working with the students regularly in an academic, pastoral and ex curricula way. They are also measuring regularly to feedback to students and parents and also to relevant external bodies. The wherewithal to undertake good career advice is there. Most schools are not resourced to provide it.

The main issue seems to be that, as a society, we do not value careers as an important subject. Whether it is in schools or with people in work who are careering (rather than controlling) in their careers, the lack of value pertains. Some people do take proactive action and they broadly fall into 2 camps – they are in pain and distress because they have lost their jobs or they are bored and frustrated and know that they have to move out of what they are doing.

Taking care of your career is a lifelong responsibility. The earlier that we can value that notion and learn how to take care of it, the better it will be for the whole of one’s working life.

Simon North is the founder of Position Ignition – a modern day, very personal careers advisory service for professionals. Simon is a career and transition expert with over 25 years experience in helping individuals with their careers. He uses his unique approach to help individuals with their personal and professional development.

http://www.positionignition.com

Blog: http://www.positionignition.com/blog

Author: Simon North


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Writing Attention Grabbing Cover Letters for Resumes That Get The Job Interview

If you have spent hours creating the perfect resume that you targeted to the company and job you were applying for only to receive a standard rejection letter, you may have neglected the importance of cover letters for resumes.

Cover letters for resumes provide the first impression of you to a prospective employer. If the employer doesnt like your cover letter, the resume may not even get a look.

So how do you write cover letters for resumes that grab the attention of readers and maintain their interest? First, your cover letter needs to be concise, short, have an easy to read layout and be error free.

The goal of cover letters for resumes is to create enough interest in the reader that your resume will be read and hopefully short-listed. A good cover letter addresses the job requirements outlined in both the advertisement and any selection criteria provided. This makes the job of the employer or human resource department a lot easier and makes it less likely that you will be culled.

Since the purpose of your cover letter is to support your application by providing evidence that you are qualified for the position and would fit in well with the organization, it is essential that you understand all the requirements of the position and learn as much as possible about the culture and circumstances of the company.

This needs to be broadly conveyed in the first paragraph of your covering letter. You also need to identify the position you are applying for in your opening paragraph as there may be a number of positions being simultaneously advertised.

You can be more specific in the following paragraph, outlining your qualifications for the position. In this paragraph, you need to explain how your work experiences, skills, education and training not only meet the requirements of the job, but make you the best person for the job.

Only include relevant details that will be of interest to the reader. If you have extensive experience and skills that meet the requirements of the company for the position, you may need another paragraph to detail them.

Once you have specifically addressed the requirements of the job, spend a paragraph discussing why you want to work for this particular organization. Show you have researched them and explain how you would fit well into their culture, contributing to the organization on a number of levels.

Finally, proofread and edit your cover letter a few times before sending it. If necessary, have someone else read it to make sure it is free of errors. Having grammatical or typographical errors in a cover letter is likely to totally ruin your chances of getting an interview.

Cover letters for resumes can make or break your job application, so it is essential to treat them seriously and make every effort to create an excellent first impression.

Author: Freddie Johnson


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Reinventing Yourself for Multiple Careers

In many countries around the globe, people are born into their station in life and hence their professions. It is unnecessary for them to plan a career as they are expected to perform one specific job their entire lives. These cultures do not consider personal growth or the possibility of choosing ones profession.

America, on the other hand, was built on self-reinvention, and todays economy demands it. Those born before 1946 are less likely to have changed careers or even worked for more than one employer during their lifetimes.

Today, many employees outlive the lifespan of the companies they work for, and the average worker can now expect to have at least three or more careers, with up to six different positions within each of those careers.

Hardly a week goes by without hearing of corporate takeovers, mergers and corporate downsizing. As a result, thousands of seasoned employees are facing burnout from increased responsibilities or being laid-off and replaced with younger, lower-paid employees. Many are looking for a different means of earning a livelihood.

For the first time in history, employees must learn to manage themselves and take responsibility for their own employment. Even the word career is taking on new meaning, as a new generation of employees is moving in and out of multiple careers during their lifetimes.

Keep in mind that a career change is not the same as job advancement within a specific career. Most are either lateral or a step down in income until you gain experience and expertise in your new career. Be prepared to downsize your lifestyle.

Think of choosing a new career as an opportunity to bring a fresh outlook and revitalization to your life, as new experiences will stimulate your thought processes.

The most importance part of selecting a new career is also the most obvious, . . . deciding on what you want to do. Often this is a natural offshoot of a previous occupation(s). Reinventing yourself often involves a unique merging of your old talents with your new skill set.

Begin by making an honest assessment of your skills, interests and experiences and ask yourself:

– What would I do if money were no object?

– What did I love to do as a child?

– What activity do I do so intently that I don’t notice time passing?

– What do I feel passionately about?

– What do I value the most?

– What are my strengths?

– What are my transferable skills?

– What kind and how much education will I need to make this change?

Most people find fulfillment by doing what theyre good at. By evaluating your skills, interests, strengths and desires you will be able to see a connection between what it is that you value and what you excel at. These are the building blocks that you can turn into a new career.

While your new career is still in the planning stages, you can gain valuable information by:

– Attending professional meetings and informal gatherings.

– Networking.

– Joining an online career discussion group.

– Asking questions.

You are likely to need some additional education in order to begin a successful new career, start by improving the skills you already have. Sometimes, learning a few new software programs is simply all it will require. Should you choose to return to college, learning new skills is much easier when you are motivated to begin a new life.

Once you have chosen the kind of work you wish to pursue and acquired the necessary education, be sure to edit your resume to reflect your strengths and skills in this area.

Dont be surprised if your job search lasts a little longer than usual. Concentrate on companies that are seeking people with your reworked skill set and eventually youll find an employer who will value the knowledge and experience you gained from your previous career(s).

It is vital today, more than ever, to remain versatile to stay employed. A successful career will evolve over a lifetime if you are continuously open to new possibilities. You must constantly seek opportunities for self-improvement and professional growth in order to be prepared for your next reinvention.

Author: Mary Carroll