9 Keys to Job Search & Career Success

In recent months, the job market has become increasingly competitive. But even as the economy slows, and there are increasing numbers of job seekers in the job market, there are many professionals who have been incredibly successful in conducting fast, effective job searches. These former job seekers have achieved new jobs that are personally, professionally, and financially rewarding. What do they have in common? How are they doing it? Here are nine tips to speed your own job search and drive it to a fast, successful conclusion.

Know what you want and go after it. Starting a job search without knowing what you want will almost certainly end in frustration. Think about it: If you don’t know what you want and what your job target is, how will you know who to contact and how to conduct your search? If you are uncertain about your career goals, it is critical that you spend some time and energy now – before launching your search – on self-introspection and analysis. Knowing what YOU want, what YOU are passionate about, and what YOU bring to the table will provide you with a confidence that simply can’t and won’t be matched by many of your competitors in the job market. This is the crucial first step to any job search and is essential for long-term career success as well.

Know and sell your personal brand. When you think about your next career move, how would things be different for you if employers and recruiters actually sought you out? Personal branding (the process of clarifying and communicating what makes you and your unique value proposition different and special) allows you to make a name for yourself. It differentiates you from your peers and helps to position you as a leader in your field – as a specialist and an authority who knows how to do a job and fill a particular niche in the workplace better than anyone else. Once you are clear on your personal brand, you can use it to project a cohesive brand image and value proposition throughout all your job search activities, and do so in a way that addresses the specific concerns of your target audience. By knowing and promoting your brand, you achieve instant, precision-like focus that positions you as the ideal candidate for the specific type of opportunity that interests you. You gain immediate competitive advantage.

Be able to clearly articulate who you are and what you have to offer. While this may feel uncomfortable to you, the simple truth is that a job search is a sales and marketing campaign: a sales and marketing campaign in which YOU are the product. Through the process of personal branding (recommended above), you must identify what differentiates you and paint a compelling portrait of your unique value proposition. But, don’t stop with just promoting this in your resume and then become tongue-tied when someone asks about you and your candidacy. You will hear the “what do you do?” or “tell me about yourself?” questions over and over, both during your job search and throughout your entire career. Don’t wing it! Preparation is the key to confidence and the key to making a lasting, positive, and memorable first impression. Be ready with a 30-60 second pitch that immediately and confidently conveys to the listener who you are as a professional and what it is that you offer.

Make their first impression your best impression. Take a hard look at your resume. Like it or not, your resume is your first introduction to most employers, and your only chance to make a good first impression. Effective resumes are highly focused marketing pieces that are strategically written and designed to sell YOU as THE best solution to a potential employer’s needs and problems. Your resume should be written to convey and illustrate your unique value proposition, with succinct “stories” that differentiate you from your competitors in the job market. Does your resume accomplish these goals? Is it focused effectively? Does it accurately present you in the way that you wish to be presented? If not, it is time to rewrite.

Network, network, network…and then network some more. The statistics are very clear, and while they vary slightly from survey to survey, they are also remarkably consistent. It is safe to say that at least 80% of all the jobs are found through the “hidden” job market, also known as the “unpublished” job market. These are jobs typically landed through word of mouth and referrals as opposed to the hit-or-miss method of answering ads, posting your resume to internet databases, or other techniques meant to target the remaining 20% of all jobs in the published market. It stands to reason that if the vast majority of the jobs are to be found in this hidden market, that you should spend the majority of your job search time working to crack it. There is no more effective job search technique than networking. So, even if it feels a little uncomfortable at first, just get out there and do it. Make networking a part of your daily routine and plan to spend the majority of your job search time on networking activities (approximately three-fourths of your time is a good estimate). The more you network, the faster your current job search will come to a successful conclusion and the faster and more successful any future job searches will be.

Plan and execute a multi-pronged job search campaign. Yes, networking is essential, but other job search techniques are also important. An effective job search campaign is a multi-pronged one that includes the strategic, planned, methodical use of a variety of job search approaches. Answering ads alone is almost never enough. Neither is working with headhunters, using internet job search sources, or researching and targeting specific employers. But, when you combine all these approaches with networking, carefully evaluate and prioritize the approaches based on relative effectiveness, and then launch an integrated, multi-pronged job search campaign, you will always come out ahead. The best job search is one in which the job seeker approaches it as if it was a job itself.

Build a support team. While your preparation will certainly ease the whole process, job searching can be a grueling and very stressful experience. So, I want to remind you that you don’t have to go through it alone. You should build a support team around you of people who can help you stay motivated and on track while giving you honest feedback and helping you stay accountable to the goals you set for yourself. Family and friends, past and present managers, your peers and colleagues, financial advisors, and professionals in the careers industry such as career counselors, coaches, and resume writers all make excellent people to add to your team. By assembling a good mix of people to support you, from a diversity of backgrounds and professions, you will receive a variety of different perspectives, ideas, and insights that can be very helpful. You should consider joining a job search support club or group – a local one if one is available or an online one. If you have been provided with outplacement services by your former employer, by all means take advantage of the office space and resources offered. The point is that you don’t have to and shouldn’t conduct your search in isolation. Surround yourself with a team that will help and support you. Above all, recognize when you need support and don’t be afraid to ask for assistance and guidance.

Always follow up. Following up on all of your contacts and your activities can do more to influence your success in achieving your job target than anything else. A hand-written thank you note or a more formal, typed thank you letter after speaking with a networking contact, attending an informational interview, or after attending an actual job interview can make a lasting positive impression that gives you a distinct competitive advantage. A follow-up phone call on every resume you send, whether it is a resume sent cold, in response to an ad, or based on a referral from one of your networking contacts can make all the difference in whether your resume is actually read and considered or not. A consistent method of follow up is key and you must make the time in your schedule to do so. Follow up will positively influence decision-makers, it will help key the process moving along, it will show your interest and your professionalism, and it will position you above the competition.

Adopt a “failure is not an option” attitude and make finding a job a job itself. Celebrate your accomplishments daily and weekly, but recognize that a successful job search requires persistence and consistent effort. The more “feelers” you put out, the more contacts you make, the more resumes you put into the hands of hiring authorities, and the more face-to-face interviews you go on, the faster you will achieve your job target. It can be difficult to remain motivated when you don’t immediately see results but remind yourself that job searching is a process and that it takes time. Reward yourself not just for the results, but for the effort.

Want to Use this Article in Your Ezine or Website? You are welcome to as long as you use the following text with it:

Nationally certified resume writer, career marketing expert, and personal branding strategist, Michelle Dumas is the founder and executive director of Distinctive Career Services LLC. Through Distinctive Documents http://www.distinctiveweb.com and her Executive VIP Services delivered through http://www.100kcareermarketing.com Michelle has empowered thousands of executives, professionals, and managers all across the U.S. and worldwide with all the tools and resources necessary to conduct a fast, effective job search. Michelle is also the author of the popular e-book 101 Before-and-After Resume Examples.

To learn more about her job search products, resume writing services, and career marketing programs, and to sign up for many other free resources, visit her websites.

Copyright 2008. All rights reserved.

Author: Michelle Dumas
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Job Searching Techniques – Truck Driver Shortage Continues

AKenworthBIGDespite the incredible downturn in the transportation sector, there is still a shortage of truck drivers and it’s huge, most estimates place it at 125,000 currently, off from 175,000 due to the economic turmoil. So, if you are searching for a job, you should check out truck driving as a potential career, most truck drivers make a very decent wage, and if you are worried about income, keeping your home or paying your bills, this is a good choice.

How do you go about searching for a truck driving job? Well, there are several sources, first go to a large travel center that sells diesel fuel for trucks and ask the clerk where the truck driver news rack is with all the truck industry magazines. They are free and there are no less than 5-different ones to look at. Pick up a copy of each and start reading all the ads.

Next, pick 5-6 that you are interested in and go to their websites to fill out their online forms. I was scanning the news in Transport Topics and Traffic World, looks like freight is down in shipping, trucking, rail and air-cargo, but I heard an ad on XM Radio for one of the trucking companies yesterday, so there is still a shortage of quality drivers even with the economic slowdown. Over the next day I heard 5 such ads all paying very well.

The financial news seems to point to a bottom of the recession, and the FED is putting money into the system, lowered rates again, and it looks like we have the government going to blow some more of our taxpayer’s money and do a trillion dollar stimulus, so things will recover, I just hope we don’t get into a runaway recessionary bubble with all this input.

What does all this mean? It means that the demand for truck drivers now is strong, and it will only get stronger as the economy recovers. So, please consider all this.

Author: Lance Winslow
Article Source: EzineArticles.com


The 5 P’s Of A Job Search

5psStep One – Plan:

Most people spend more time planning a one to two week vacation than they do planning their lifetime career. When planning for a vacation, you look at where you want to go, what your reason is for wanting to go to that particular place, how long it will take to get there, whether or not you want to take any side trips, what type of budget you will need, and what type of clothes you will need to take. You may also speak with people who have been there to find out a little more about the destination and activities or do some research on the internet or at the library or a travel agency.

It is important to do the same type of planning for a career. You need to take a look at where you want to go and how you are going to get there. You will need to look at: whether or not you need post-secondary education or some type of training. How long will it take you to get the skills you need? What is the best way to get these skills? What kind of money do you require for the life style you want? Think about whether or not you know anyone who is currently working in this field or if you know anyone who knows anyone working in this field. Where else can you go to find out more information?

If you are still in school, speak to a guidance counsellor and ask for information. You can also do informational interviews with people working in the field you are interested in. Another option is speaking with a career counsellor or doing some career tests.

If you are out of school, contact an employment agency to speak with a counsellor or do some personal research at the library as well as networking and making good use of your contacts.

Step Two – Prepare:

Preparing for your job search involves doing a thorough personal inventory to determine your transferable and adaptive skills. Learning more about your skills prepares you so that you will be able to tell an employer the skills you have that match the job that you would like to have. This takes time. It may involve completing a questionnaire or sitting and writing down all the things you have done over the years. This is not simply listing your job description, as most people do more than what is listed on the job description, it also involves activities that you do at home.

Most of us take our skills for granted. We are so used to doing certain tasks that we do not recognize that not everyone can do what we are doing. We also do not always recognize the skills we are using in our daily activities problem solving, decision making, driving, fixing appliances, preparing food, personal counseling. People may express amazement or be impressed by something that we take for granted. Listen to what they are saying. This is a strong skill for you and may be developed into a career goal.

Once you have reviewed your skills, you can work on developing a 30-second summary of these skills, also known as an elevator speech, which can be used during a telephone contact, in your cover letter, in an interview, or when talking to friends about your job search.

Preparing also means doing research on companies you might like to work for. This research may be done at the library, through personal contact, informational interviews, reading newspaper articles, or an informal visit or tour.

The development of a targeted resume is another crucial step. A targeted resume is one which highlights specific skills to demonstrate your suitability to an employer. It provides details of your work experiences which match the skills they might require. A cover letter should also be prepared for a targeted employer.

Another part of preparation is reviewing potential interview questions and determining the type of information you want to provide or you may be expected to provide to an employer. Following this, you need to practice speaking about yourself in order to be comfortable in presenting yourself to an employer.

People often think about getting a resume prepared, and maybe a cover letter in response to a job ad, but then they forget about preparing for the interview. Although a good resume and cover letter can get you in the door, the interview is what gets you the job.

Step Three – Practice:

Practice!! How many people would step on the ice in an NHL game without having practiced? How many people would step on stage to sing or act without several rehearsals? How many Olympic athletes would compete without any preparation? Very few, if any – and yet, when we fail to practice our interview techniques, it is comparable to doing one of the above.

Practicing can take place with a friend, family member or a counsellor. There are many books available that provide sample questions and sample answers. Feedback on your interview skills may involve peers, general comments, and/or videotape. Here are some sample questions for you to use:

Tell me about yourself.

What do you look for in a job?

How long would it take for you to make a meaningful contribution?

Why are you looking for a new career?

How would your boss describe you?

How would your colleagues describe you?

What were the five most significant accomplishments in your last position?

What are your strong points?

What are your weak points?

A videotape is an excellent way for you to see yourself as an employer would see you. You can dress as you would for an interview and have someone you know act as the interviewer. You will then be able to notice how you handle yourself, how you sit, and how you respond to questions. For instance, did you give enough information or too much information. You can also note if you have any habits you are unaware of. This will help you become comfortable in presenting your skills to an employer.

When you think of the years of training it takes a hockey player to reach the skill level of an NHL player, or the years a ballerina spends in practicing before she performs at the NAC, a few hours of practicing your interview/presentation techniques isnt asking too much.

Step Four – Perform:

Think of your interview as a performance. You must prepare for it (research the employer, practice interview questions), dress appropriately (dress for the job you are applying for), and have the proper equipment (copy of resume, references, portfolio, and pen) to show that you are ready to do the job.

The first two to three minutes of your interview are the most important. An employer usually makes a decision based on your appearance and your opening presentation. It is important that you make the most of these precious minutes.

A smile is a big part of your wardrobe. If smiling doesnt come naturally to you, practice in front of a mirror until it feels comfortable. Ensure that your body language doesnt send the wrong message. Dont cross your arms across your chest, or keep checking the clock. Check your appearance, both standing and seated, in a mirror. It is important to try to relax, but do not slouch in your chair. Dont chew gum during your interview, and if you are a smoker, try to have your last cigarette at least 10 minutes before your interview and freshen your breath with a breath mint.

Another important point is to never say anything negative about your previous employer. It may make the employer wonder what you would say about them, and you never know who is related to whom.

Make sure that you have some questions to ask the employer. Not how much money will I make and how long do I get for vacation?, but questions that show you have researched the employer and have some knowledge of their company. Make a list of potential questions to ask. If the interviewer has been very thorough and you cant think of any questions, at least find out when they will be making a decision and ask if it is ok to follow up.

Here are some sample questions you can ask.

Why is this position open?

What are some of the more difficult problems one would have to face in this position?

What significant changes do you forsee in the near future?

What are some of the objectives you would like to see accomplished in this job?

What are some of the long-term objectives you would like to see completed?

How is one evaluated in this position?

What accounts for success within the company?

Step Five – Post-Mortem:

Once your interview is over, review it in your mind. Was there anything you should have said that you didnt, or anything that you said that you shouldnt have? Make a mental note, or write down how you felt about the interview. By reviewing your interview, you can prepare for the next one.

Once you get home, its time to prepare a thank you letter. In this letter you thank the interviewer(s) for their time and the opportunity to find out more about the company. Express appreciation for the way they handled the interview, the information provided, etc., as well as expressing your desire to work for the company. If there was anything you forgot to tell them about your skills during the interview, or any information you said you would provide them with, now is your opportunity to do so.

Dont forget to follow up one to two weeks after your interview to indicate that you are still interested in being considered for the position and to check on whether or not a decision has been made. If they have hired, and you are not the successful candidate, ask permission to call back in case there are any other openings in the future and let them know that you would like to be considered.

Remember that you usually have to go through about 200 “no’s” before you get to a “yes”. Try to keep positive about your job search by sticking with a routine and talking with as many people as possible about looking for work. Let everyone know that you are currently unemployed and tell them the type of work you are looking for. Attend workshops on Job Search or consider joining a Job Finding Club for extra support during your job search.

Author: Fran Watson
Article Source: EzineArticles.com


Creative Job Search Techniques – Build a Network

mit-grad1With the recession about to hit us and job losses on the increase, you need to employ some creative job search techniques if you want to get hired.

The truth is that most people are taught the wrong way to find a job and so they end up using the least effective job search methods available. This makes life tough at the best of times, but a lot more difficult at times of economic uncertainty.

So, if you want to find a job when the government is telling you we are on the verge of recession, at a time when people are losing their savings and their jobs and having their homes repossessed, you need to find some efficient job search techniques.

So, how do you go about finding a job? If you are like most people, you search online and you look in the local press or specialist journals. Then you send in an application form or a rsum or CV with a cover letter and you wait for a reply. If you are particularly industrious, you may send out hundreds of these applications and still not get an interview.

Experts agree that these methods, whilst being the techniques most frequently taught and most frequently used, are in fact, the least effective, accounting for a very low percentage of success, somewhere in the range of 5-14%.

So, you could get a job using these methods, but if the success rate is so low, you need some more ideas.

One of the most effective job search strategies is building a network of contacts. You’ve heard the theory that there are only six degrees of separation between everyone on the planet and whether that is true or not, the more people who know you are looking for work, the greater the chance of meeting someone who is interested in hiring you.

Creating a network does take a bit of time and effort, but it will pay off. You can start with friends and family and use professional networking sites on the internet. You can also contact professional colleagues and people you have worked with in the past.

Don’t be put off by the fact that you don’t think that anyone in your immediate circle is likely to know anyone who might give you a job. Everyone that you know has their own circle of friends and acquaintances.

Go about building your network in a professional manner. Look at it as a job in itself and spend time developing it every day. Be sure that you have a good generic resume or CV typed up, which can be targeted to a specific job very quickly or used as a general introduction.

If you are employed at the moment but afraid that you may lose your job in the current crisis, start building your network right away. Even if you do avoid being laid off, your network will be a valuable resource for the future.

Author: Waller Jamison
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
Provided by: Beading Necklace


Job Search Techniques: Smashing The Gray Ceiling

APJobInterviewFor decades, women have chaffed at the invisible glass ceiling which prevents their moving into the high executive brackets that their competence, knowledge and skills have earned. The same amorphous barrier confronts older workers both in terms of advancement within a company and, most especially, when a job change is required. There is an adage in the military that if a rank above major has not been obtained within twenty years, it never will be. The ranks of early military retirees are sprinkled with majors who knew that ten or fifteen more years would never bring a Colonel’s cluster.

How can such “unwritten rules” be fought? No lawsuit can prove that you were the best individual for the job. No employer is unintelligent enough to state that your age is the stumbling block. You sense the discrimination, you become aware of the sideways glances and the emotional response of an interviewer, but you feel powerless to change their perspective and their bias.

Sitting across an interviewing desk, often facing an individual the same age as your son, your esteem erodes and your confidence self-destructs. Impotent, humiliated, and angry, you accept that nothing you can say is going to change anything. You continue job hunting with a mounting sense of frustration and an indisputable anticipation of failure.

If you have nothing to lose, why not attack the problem head-on? Prejudice and discrimination survive only in the silence of unexamined judgments and, often unconscious, illogic. Confront the situation and at least you create the opportunity for the white light of reason to enter the fray.

Try these approaches to prompt more honest interaction and possibly more rational conclusions.

1. You need to be the one to put the age issue on the table. Offer it gently, as one area of needed exploration regarding why you fit the employer’s needs. Bring it up objectively, as something that can be discussed unemotionally, without triggering lethal interviewer defensiveness.

2. Acknowledge your age as a basis for emphasizing the experience of a lifetime and the value that such experience can provide to any employer. Concentrate on describing how business has changed over the course of years and how deftly you have adapted to those changes and incorporated new ideas and technical advancements into your work performance.

3. Acknowledge common misperceptions about the weaknesses of age: hard-to-break habits, lack of flexibility, technological ignorance, and distrust of authority, especially if young. Then use your sales ability to eliminate those misperceptions, probably already resonating in the interviewer’s head.

Habits: Remind your host of the ability to adapt and reshape yourself which has kept your thinking young. Stress your relish for new challenges and innovative approaches. Cite some examples from your past about how smoothly you have been able to change to new workflows and procedures.

Flexibility: Discuss your dislike of unproductive routine and your preference for trying new methods of approaching tasks. Stress those times in the past when you were able to develop creative solutions to long-term problems and how your resourcefulness helped your previous employers.

Technology: Identify new technical advances within your field and address how you have internalized those changes. If you have successfully transitioned from dictating to a secretary to email and instant messaging, if you have moved from a manual adding machine to competent computer literacy, then small changes like learning new software or novel production systems should be a snap.

Authority issues: You have attained authority in the past and you have also worked under a variety of supervisors in your long career life. Clarify your relationship with power: the respect you extend to those who are knowledgeable, the loyalty and support you offer any leader of your team, the self-respect you enjoy which allows you to participate in group goals enthusiastically without feeling that you need to be in charge or command the top title.

4. Once you have demolished the myths of age, emphasize its strengths: reliability, mature judgment, lack of impulsivity, timeliness, a strong work ethic, and the ability to perform without outside distractions such as personal relationship problems, child commitments, and social responsibilities.

Undoubtedly, there are individuals out there who have their own issues with hiring someone who reminds them of their father or who have had problems in the past with an underperforming older worker who was difficult to terminate. There will always be those you cannot reach, no matter how convincing your logic and your presentation.

There are many more who are open-minded and seek not to make rash judgments. Address their semi-conscious fears face to face and the interview may end successfully – for both you and your lucky new employer.

Author: Virginia Bola, PsyD
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
Provided by: Digital Camera News


Don’t Want The Job? Do This!

Most people do not prepare properly for an interview. A lot of time, energy
and money are spent in preparation for the chance to have an interview
meeting with a prospective employer. However, little to no preparation is
done for the interview itself. Most professionals spend an incredible amount
of time preparing their resume, and even make a considerable investment to
have their resumes prepared by skilled professionals so as to increase their
chances of getting the interview. Ironically, many of these same professionals
will then spend minimal time or investment in making certain that their interview
skills are fine tuned.

Dear job seeker here is 25 years of collective business experience and wisdom
boiled down into this piece of advice. Don’t prepare for the interview, IF
you don’t want the JOB!

Having an employer ask you to interview is not the ultimate goal; it’s the
second to last step in the overall job search process. The candidate
interview is only one of several steps along the way. Being the very best
candidate during the interview will typically result in the candidate landing
that dream job offer. Many professionals make the same mistakes during the
job search process.

Amazingly, these well educated, highly skilled and experienced professionals
keep repeating the same mistake and yet, expect different results or outcomes
from candidate interviews. Often professionals treat the interview as something
that is a forgone conclusion. Somehow the confusion develops from thinking that
the interview is the same as the job offer, let me reassure everyone taking a few
minutes to read this article, in a word WRONG!

So, if your goal is not landing the job of your dreams, then all you have to do is
make the same critical errors outlined for you below. I promise you that if you
consistently make all of the common mistakes listed the only job you land is the
one you don’t want; an eternity of searching for your next job.

Far more interviews are lost than won. There are things that will work to
your advantage in an interview, and then again there are things that will
absolutely kill your chances. Here are some of the biggest mistakes to avoid,
if you want that job. Your chances for success vastly improve by not doing
what others do.

1. Don’t Conduct Any “Pre-Flight” Planning!

This is the single biggest mistake you can make. There is a direct
correlation to preparation and performance. Many professionals are walking
into their interviews ill-equipped and unprepared and expecting to make the
right impression. These professional are not walking away from the interview
with job offer and unfortunately become doomed to repeat the process until
the lesson is learned.

Good preparation means doing intensive research so that you know what you
need to know about the hiring authority, knowing your capabilities and what
you specifically can offer the hiring authority in the position they seek to
fill. You must prepare and then practice so as to be able to respond to
nearly any question thrown in your direction.

2. Don’t Be Dynamic, Be Passive During The Interview!

You do not need to conduct the interview. However, this is your time to shine.
You are in the spotlight. It’s your opportunity to prove that you are the
best candidate. It is not the interviewer’s job to pull the information from
you. Many people mistakenly believe that it’s up to the hiring authority’s
interviewer to figure out if you’re the best candidate. As the candidate, it
is your responsibility to make the interviewer aware of your capabilities and
why you are the best candidate to fill the open position.

Your goal is to make certain as you complete the interview, the interviewer
knows all of your qualifications and how you will make positive and powerful
contributions in your new position. By taking responsibility for your actions
and accepting that you must convey your skills, experience, talent and
persona in the most positive manner, it changes the way you prepare and how
you conduct yourself during the interview. It separates your candidacy from
the competition.

Often professionals “wing it” during the interview process. The problem is,
if you do that you are leaving your career to chance and letting someone else
take control of your destiny. If you want to succeed in an interview, you
have to be proactive and think on your feet. An interview is the starting
gate of a competitive race – there’s only one winner. You should be thinking
about what you need to say and do during the interview to be recognized as
the best candidate to fill the position. What does the interview seek to find
in a candidate? What do they want to hear from me? How can I be the candidate
they select? Don’t get caught up in the mindset of not preparing for the
interview, think it through and plan for all possibilities so that you can
beat the competition.

3. Why Make A Good First Impression? I Can Always Make A Second One, Right?

Wrong! Here’s the fact – it only takes a few minutes for the interviewer to
assess his/her first impression of you. You only get one chance to make a
first impression. If you make a great first impression, the interviewer will
automatically look for more positive contributions throughout the remainder
of the interview to justify their first impression. The reverse is true. If
you make a bad first impression, the interviewer will look for bad things to
justify their first impression. It is either a Win-Win or Lose-Lose proposition
with no middle ground. Your first impression must be good.

You must start out strong and maintain the strength.
Starting strong means greeting the interviewer with confidence, being
personable, and conducting yourself professionally at all times. No matter
how formal or informal the interviewer may appear during the interview
process, you must exude confidence and professional demeanor.
Maintaining strength means nailing the first couple questions and all the
subsequent questions thrown out at you.

One of the most difficult questions can also be one of the easiest to answer.
Most interviewers want to hear a strong answer to these four words,
“tell me about yourself”. Often these four words may be the most important
question asked during an interview. Consequently, the question becomes the
most important one you need to know how to answer.

4. Value? Value? We Don’t Know Our Stinkin Value!

Knowing your specific value relative to the hiring authority is a big part of
your preparation. More important is the ability to articulate your value in a
concise, professional and intelligent manner. It boils down to good verbal
and non-verbal communication skills.

A couple of different ways to improve your communication skills
in an interview: 1) prepare yourself – know your value, memorialize
it through documentation and then practice. 2) ask for help -a professional
sounding board being either a qualified (recruiter) friend or career
professional, i.e., search recruiter or career coach, and 3) reflect on your
self figuratively and also in the mirror (remember to smile
and relax your words will flow smoothly) and then practice some more.
You will leap ahead of other the other competing candidates as they will most
likely stumble their way through the interview process. You will be the
coherent, articulate, intelligent candidate clearly expressing why you are
the best choice. You’ll be remembered for all the right reasons unlike your
competition.

5. Fake It Until You Make It?

Everyone going through a job search and interview process experiences a time
when there may be at least one qualification that you don’t have – maybe its
lack of industry experience, lack of a degree or a specific accreditation
they’ve asked to see from you, it could be anything. If you do lack something
they want or need, you need to be ready to address it and do so with
confidence. Whatever you do always be direct and honest.

Unfortunately, during interviews we are often times screened out for
something we lack rather than the other way around. So interviewers need to
convinced that if you don’t have exactly what they seek, you can learn it
quickly, or you’ll get it, or you have another skill that makes up for it.
Don’t give them the opportunity to make a big deal out of something you lack…
be poised and confident without showing any signs of being nervous. Find an
answer that eliminates their concern and most likely they’ll select you based
on what you can offer rather than eliminate you for something they deem
important that you don’t possess.

Remember, a superior resume is valuable because it gets you the interview…but
superior interviewing skills will get you the job! Improve your interviewing
skills, learn the best practices and strategies to succeed, and you will
consistently get the offers you want.

Wishing You All Job Search and Interviewing Success!

Author: David A. Blender
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
Provided by:


Prepare Yourself to Conquer Your Interview Fears

by Heather Eagar

fearMost people are pretty nervous when preparing for an interview, whether it’s their first or 51st time. However there are some individuals who are beyond nervous when interview time rolls around – they’re flat out fearful. It may be that they’re extremely shy, have inherent “stage fright,” or are just afraid of facing someone perceived to be an authority figure. Read more

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