On Campus Interviews – A Chance for Your “First Job” as Well as Career Employment

During the course of training or secondary educations some organizations – companies, firms as well as major non-profit organizations of great status and reputation will offer campus interviews to graduating students in such fields as engineering, electronics, business management, law accounting, computer information systems and marketing. In addition such “on campus” interviews are also afforded at many major technical schools in similar and matching fields and endeavors.

The hardest point for many, in terms of their careers, and the progress of their careers is to get their “foot into the door”. Even if you do not necessarily like the job, the company or organization- the value of these jobs is that they will do just that – get you started in your field of choice. What is most important is the contacts and networking you will be able to do. The hardest part so to speak is “to get your first job”.

Once you are in that position of employment several factors will work into play: first of all you will make valuable contacts within your industry. In a sense you never know who that you meet, when working and interacting within your job and career that can help you. One contact, in your network and daily interactions can lead to other useful contacts. It’s an organic process. Secondly, even if the firm or organization is not your first choice, for employment or career, you are in a position to prove yourself within that community. After all most jobs are not filled by applications and job postings. Most jobs are filled from within – by personal referrals and reputations and of course by the industry “grapevine”. By being employed, rather than not employed or “still looking”, you will be considered more valuable by other prospective employers. After all you are valuable enough that employer number one is paying you x salary. If employer number 2 wishes to hire you away – you not only have proven yourself, but in addition the second employer will have to pay you more, either in actual cash , benefits , a better job , or some other form of reward, in order to steal you away and hire you. Lastly by working in a job, rather than not being employed, most employers will fund various specialized courses and training, that you may not well not be able to afford, or may not be available to yourself.

Most on-campus interviews are prearranged interviews, and the techniques used varied, depending on the organization. They are usually structured interviews, but several styles may be used, including the “stress interview”, the “tell me about yourself interview”, and the panel interview styles.

Campus interviews are generally scheduled through a school or institution’s career services office or department. The schedule is closely observed, and the interviewer is forced to evaluate each candidate more quickly than standard interview procedures. It is said that in such scenarios the average interview time is between 20 and 30 minutes.

If you are lucky enough to be chosen and interviewed in such a setting and format what should you consider and stress during these meetings? First of all you should keep your remarks as concise and to the point as possible. You will find that most of the interviewers are professionally trained. They have been trained for this purpose and will know how to guide applicants through the fact finding process. It is best to let the interviewer take the lead. Go with the flow and format of the interview and its dynamic processes. Your job is to respond as concisely as possible without omitting pertinent information about your qualifications.

After all it may well lead to your first job in your chosen career and field of endeavors.

Shaun Stevens

http://www.winnipegjobshark.com
http://www.jerkbossesihaveknown.com
http://www.albertajobshark.com

Author: Shaun Stevens


Jobs & Career Employment After You Have Graduated From University

careersmainImageUniversity graduates are still sought after, which makes a degree in this difficult financial climate worth its weight in gold. Graduate positions have actually increased over the last year, during the recession, and this is leading companies promoting their HR policies of capturing the best minds straight from university.

Jobs in IT, accounting, mechanical engineering, bio sciences are particularly impressive for the graduate as firms in these sectors offer high salaries and many graduate services that announce jobs, like MilkRound will advertise all of these particular jobs. Some jobs are obviously with companies that could feel the pain of the credit crunch but with any gain of experience, you will become immediately more employable even if the worst does happen to you.

Obviously qualifications and skills will get you so far, but with many graduates applying for the same jobs, how can you set yourself apart and differently then the rest? Well the answer is in your character traits, and making them visible to the recruiter. An attitude of enthusiasm, self- motivation and determination will go a long way in any job interview, some companies who offer jobs at entry level, will make a decision based on this alone!

Obviously verbal and writing skills are a necessity and having problem solving skills and being a team player will also endear you to the employer. It is also important to apply for jobs that you are skilled to do. Obviously jobs with 40k salaries look great and you’d love to be on that one, but you need to stay realistic and gain experience in your first few years after university, so apply for jobs you are happy to do.

If you have a Masters degree of an even higher education award then larger businesses in certain sectors may head hunt you, this is certainly true in the past in the banking, insurance and retail management positions. If you have just a bachelors degree then there are many opportunities out there but it will take you longer to get there!

Author: Marie Warren
Article Source: EzineArticles.com


Business Demands Career Employment Strategies That Develop Business Leadership and High Work Ethics

student-laptopFor many years, the business world has been asking higher education to meet their needs of developing future knowledge workers who are self-leaders that take responsibility for their actions and have solid decision making and problem solving skills. An article in the Newsweek’s November 13, 2006 issue indicates that higher education has yet to hear this decades long message.

In this article, a recent graduate of an Ivy League School, shared her experiences that she lacked the fundamentals from completing a W-2 to how to rent an apartment. What was interesting was that she noted that she was not alone. According to her article, she referenced a recent study of career employment (source not cited) that hundreds of employers found new college graduates “woefully unprepared” for the job market.

For years education from K-13 has focused on learning or the acquisition of knowledge, but has miserably failed on performance or the application of knowledge. Universities or higher education continue this tradition and the 21st century is reaping the results unprepared workers who are highly intelligent, but cant negotiate themselves out of a cardboard box.

The University of Michigan Annual Recruiting Trends has documented the needs of employers for over 30 years. In its 2002 report, employers want graduates who have a passion for the position along with a total package including:

  • Verbal communication skills
  • Written communication skills
  • Leadership
  • Teamwork
  • Computer skills
  • Work ethics
  • Integrity

Dr. Carol Di-Amico in her research Workforce 2020 indicated that employers looked for the following when hiring experienced workers:

  • Leadership 73%
  • Problem solving skills 69%
  • Work ethics 68%
  • Job specific skills 61%
  • Creativity 60%
  • Organizational skills 49%
  • Interpersonal skills 45%
  • Given that many employers are looking for skill sets that are not currently being taught at the higher academic levels and probably not at the high school levels for those not immediately attending college suggests that these institutions of learning are indeed setting many young people up to fail. This would not be such a tragedy if they were not collecting thousands of dollars.

    Finally, the author of this article in Newsweek believed that she invested her dollars to better advance her thinking abilities. She further wrote that her thinking was limited to the academic world and failed to transfer into the real world. Yet, it is those same professors in the academic world who insist that those in the business world where profits and losses are both earned and measured on a daily basis do not understand how to think and that education cannot be viewed as a business. This attitude is great if you are not accountable for securing results. Until education realizes its purpose is to successfully complete the next learning sequence (that means the graduates are gainfully employed in their field of expertise for at least one year) where personal and business leadership is highly developed along with all those interpersonal skills necessary for success, this young person’s experience will be multiplied by thousands more and our nation will continue to suffer.

    Author: Leanne Hoagland-Smith
    Article Source: EzineArticles.com